The 5 Best Books I’ve Read This Year

My friend Beth asked for book recommendations, so here we are near the end of National Blog Posting Month, and I’m gladly taking requests! One more day!

  1. Eligible: A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice by Curtis Sittenfeld. I’m a huge fan of Jane Austen and this was a humorous modern take on one of my favorite books. And while I know the plot of the original backwards and forwards, there were a few surprises in Sittenfeld’s retelling to keep me guessing. Highly recommend.
  2. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion. I had read about this book on many blogs and book sites, but what finally grabbed my attention was that Bill Gates had read it and loved it so much he was gifting it to his friends. Definitely worth the read!
  3. Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand in the Sun and Be Your Own Person by Shonda Rhimes. This is by far the best self-help, get up off your ass and seize the day book that I’ve ever read. I recommend this book to everyone. And listen to the audiobook! You will not regret it. I’ve already made a resolution to listen to it at least once a year.
  4. Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson. Before you read this one, read or listen to her first book, Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir. You will laugh and cry and feel less alone in the world, especially if you’ve ever suffered from depression or anxiety.
  5. Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology by Leah Remini. I became slightly obsessed with scientology after listening to one of my favorite podcast’s 9-part series on the mysterious church. So when I heard that Leah Remini had left the church and wrote a tell-all story, I had to listen. After listening to hours of the podcast and hours of her book, I’m still mystified by scientology and can’t get enough!

What’s the best book you’ve read this year?

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One thought on “The 5 Best Books I’ve Read This Year

  1. Here are a few of the really good books that I’ve read this year… well, two of them:
    The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd, which is about the intertwined lives of the daughter of slaveowners in the antebellum south and the slave who was given to her to be her personal maid.
    The Wisdom of the Earth, by Christopher Scotton. Coming of age story of a troubled 14 year old boy, Kevin, in an equally troubled town in Kentucky. The story is about the people and about the controversial practice of mountaintop removal.

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